Thursday, May 14, 2020
Music Education News Online – Dr. J. Pisano

Learning a musical instrument helps academic success – Music Education Works

By Dr. J. Pisano , in Music Education Research , at January 23, 2020 Tags:


Students at Reigate Grammar School in Surrey who learned a musical instrument achieved better A-level results than their non-musician peers in 2018. Thirty-six per cent of students who learnt an instrument achieved A*s in their A-levels, while the figure was 28 per cent for non-musicians. Similarly, 43 per cent of instrument-learning students achieved A grades, but only 36 per cent of non-musicians.

Fifty-eight per cent of students learning to play more than one musical instrument achieved an A* in their A-levels.

The findings follow a decision by the independent school to look at the link between learning a musical instrument and academic success, in order to highlight the importance of music education.

State schools in England have seen a 21% decrease in music provision over the last five years, while access to music in independent schools has risen by 7%, according to the BPI.

“It is data like this that reaffirms my commitment to provide a wealth of musical opportunities in the curriculum, through learning an instrument, through choirs and ensembles, through house events and more,” said Shaun Fenton, head of Reigate Grammar School.

“Too narrow a focus on ‘just’ studying might even actually reduce the chances of exam success. The dangers of the EBac, which doesn’t currently include art or music GCSE, are clear. At Reigate Grammar School, it’s all about STEAM rather than ‘just’ STEM.”

Image from Pixabay, reproduced under Creative Commons CC0.

SOURCE:
Independent Education Today: https://ie-today.co.uk/Article/learning-a-musical-instrument-aids-academic-success-says-reigate-grammar-school/

DETAILS:

BENEFIT: ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT
TARGET GROUP: YOUNG ADULTS
AGE: 16-18 YEARS-OLD
MUSIC TYPE: INSTRUMENTAL
TYPE OF STUDY: ACADEMIC RESEARCH
NOs INVOLVED: 141
PERIOD OF STUDY: UNKNOWN
DATE: 2018
PLACE: UK



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